Homemade Spiced Cranberry Relish

This is a come-back* recipe!

It’s Canadian Thanksgiving and, once again, I will be whipping up delicious, low-calorie, and easy-to-make cranberry relish.

This relish with its lovely undertones of orange, cinnamon, and ginger is so superior to the canned variety—taste-wise, nutrition-wise, and calorie-wise—that I decided to re-post it just in time for the Canadian holiday and well in time for American Thanksgiving.

Happy holidays to all!

*It’s original title was Dieter’s Spiced Cranberry Relish.

 

Continue reading

Chicken and/or Turkey Meatloaf with Broccoli Slaw and Feta Cheese

Last night's dinner.

My granddaughter, Adesia (aged 13), comes regularly on Tuesdays after school to cook with me. My challenge is to keep this sous-chef interested so I always plan to have a culinary experiment on hand to intrigue the both of us.

This Tuesday, that challenge was meatloaf. I had both ground chicken and turkey on hand, and I wanted to expand on my earlier ground turkey recipes* by adding in more vegetables.

When I presented the challenge, the sous-chef only wanted to make sure that the dish would include bread crumbs. “A meatloaf without bread crumbs?” I said. “Heaven forbid.”

(Interestingly, my granddaughter’s desire for breadcrumbs meant that I had to add eggs, which I did by using the 1 egg per 1 pound of meat rubric. These additional ingredients raised the calorie count of the meatloaf, and I think it would be possible to do this dish without either breadcrumbs or eggs.)

All of which is a preamble to the final thumbs-up, high-five result: a delicious, spicy meatloaf with saltiness from the cheese, crunchiness from the slaw and green onions, and occasional sweetness from the dried cranberries. Oh, and it was delicious cold when I had it for lunch today.

Continue reading

Chicken/Turkey Barbecue Bake with Vegetables

Back from our vacation in the Dutch Antilles and back in my kitchen where I almost kissed every appliance. The kitchen in our Bonaire apartment was smaller than most bathrooms, not air-conditioned, and lacking basics, like an oven!

And as for gluten-free products? I found one natural food store with hardly anything to sell and sky-high prices. A small bag of red quinoa was $18.00!!!

But the snorkelling and scuba-diving were great, we missed a major snowstorm in Ottawa, and I (seeking sloth) and my new e-reader bonded together spectacularly.

I also took a shine to the name of the local supermarket—so much more interesting than “Safeway” (US) or “Metro” (Canada), don’t you think?

Once back home, I was determined to make the perfect gluten-free angel food cake. I had tried this three times already, and had gotten a fairly decent rise but was still working on the taste. This time, the dratted thing collapsed entirely. Blessings on the head of my sweet 13-year-old granddaughter and sous-chef, Adesia, who declared it still delicious and took it home for school lunches.

So…instead, today, I bring you a no-fail, cinch-to-make, reminiscent-of-summer Barbecue Bake that I’ve used for both chicken and turkey breasts. (It would also be great for thighs and legs.)

This photo is of last night’s dinner—a turkey breast, this time, baked with potatoes and vegetables to make a complete meal. The spicy sauce helps the meat stay moist during baking and provides a delicious grace note of taste to the entire meal.

Continue reading

Turkey Meatloaf Muffins: It’s All About Portion Control

Do you want burgers that you don’t have to fry or broil?  Or meatloaf that can be done in 30 minutes?  Or find a strategy for helping with portion control?

Then you might find this recipe helpful. Basically, I altered Turkey Burgers with Dried Cranberries into a meatloaf “format,” used sage instead of rosemary, and used a muffin, instead of a loaf, pan.

I had three terrific results: the muffins were as delicious as the burgers (although nothing can beat those burgers when they’re grilled on the barbecue); they cooked in less than half the time for a meatloaf; and (best of all) they provided instant portion control.

Continue reading

Dieter’s Spiced Cranberry Relish

We Canadians celebrate Thanksgiving on October 10 so our family had its groaning board yesterday, replete with turkey, stuffing, and all the usual wonderful and calorie-rich accompaniments.

In the past, I used to throw caution to the winds and dolloped lots of cranberry sauce (canned) on my turkey even though I knew it was chock-full of sugar.  This year, I decided to make my own cranberry sauce and spend those calories elsewhere—on pumpkin pie, for example, and some stuffing.  And this was a good thing for two reasons.

First of all, this relish was a much superior product to the canned variety: the cranberry flavour enhanced by spicy undertones of orange and spices.  And secondly, I needed to save those extra calories because one daughter brought home-made coconut macaroons, which were to die for.

And, honestly?  My diet did die a little…a smidgeon, really, dear god of weight loss.  But then, such is the fate of diets when Thanksgiving rolls around.

Continue reading

Crustless Chicken/Turkey Quiche

My husband and I have a small cabin cruiser, called the Outrageous, which we use as a moveable cottage in the lakes near Ottawa.  We’ve been boating for 20 years and love to anchor or tie up somewhere and enjoy the sun, nature, wildlife, and living without a computer for a few days.

So, you’re asking, what does this have to do with refashioning food? 

Well, to make a long story short, the boat’s galley (kitchen) is the size and shape of a shower stall.  (In the photo, the 2nd porthole in the bow of the boat is the galley’s window.) In it is a scaled-down refrigerator, a microwave, and a cooktop with three burners, except that I can only use one burner at a time because our inboard generator can’t handle more.  Not surprisingly, I prepare as much food as I can at home beforehand, such as washing salad greens, making a quick bread, steaming broccoli, mixing up a batch of spaghetti sauce, and so on.

After a recent trip for which I had roasted a plump chicken, we came home with leftovers.  Needless to say, the allure of chicken had worn quite thin so I decided on a gustatorial disguise—a crustless quiche made with Swiss chard, mushrooms, and sheep romano cheese. Voilà!  The rich, dark taste of the vegetables and the sharpness of the cheese completely overpowered the white and dark chicken meat hidden within.  Oh, and it was delicious too!

Printer-friendly recipe

Makes 4 servings

Ingredients

    • 8 oz. cooked chicken or turkey
    • 1 bunch Swiss chard or spinach (I used Swiss chard and had 8 cups worth)
    • 1 cup water
    • ½ cup of chicken broth or 2 tbsp. chicken broth powder + ½ cup water
    • 2 tsp. garlic, minced
    • 1 small yellow onion, diced
    • 8 oz. of sliced mushrooms, any type
    • Spices of your choice (I used 2 tsp. of chopped fresh sage)
    • 1 cup liquid egg substitute (approx. 4 regular eggs)
    • ½ cup sheep romano cheese, grated
    • ¼ – ½ cup soy milk or other alternative milk, if necessary
    • Cooking spray

Directions

  1. Chop cooked chicken into small pieces and put in a large bowl.
  2. Prepare chard by soaking in cold water to clean and removing hard stems.  Drain and then cut in two steps: first lengthwise (creating ribbons); then crosswise, chopping coarsely.
  3. Put chard in a saucepan, add 1 cup of water, and cover.  Cook for about 10 minutes over medium heat until leaves are wilted.  Drain and press out additional water.
  4. In a non-stick frying pan, heat chicken broth until bubbling.  
  5. Sauté garlic, onions, mushrooms, and spices in broth until soft.
  6. In the bowl containing the chicken, add all other ingredients: drained chard, sautéd onion and mushroom mixture, egg substitute, and cheese.  (If your mixture seems too thick, you can add ½ cup of milk.)
  7. Spray 10″ x 10″ pan and pour mixture into it. (I wasn’t sure I could fit the mixture into a 10″ pie plate.)
  8. Bake in 350°F oven and cook for 40-45 minutes or until dish is set and edges are brown.

For Weight Watchers: One serving is 4 points on the Points plan and PointsPlus plans.  Note: If you want to add milk, the addition will not significantly affect the point count.

(Adapted from “Swiss Chard and Mushroom Squares” at Kalyn’s Kitchen blog.  Thank you, Kalyn!)

Turkey Burgers with Dried Cranberry

The grilling season is back with lots of good things that my husband gets to cook (for a change)!  Tonight’s meal was turkey burgers with asparagus (the local crop is in) and a salad.

The challenge: How to make turkey burgers that weren’t bland facsimiles of beef burgers.  I wanted to make the meat so tasty that we wouldn’t need ketchup, mustard, and pickles—condiments that enhance beef but would drown the more delicate taste of turkey—and buns that are just designed to hold in all the burger dressings and add way too many carbs. 

The solution: Spice the meat with rosemary, highlight it with green onions, and add the occasional sweet surprise of dried cranberries.  These burgers have a delicious, delicate flavour and don’t require anything beyond themselves to satisfy the palate.

Printer-friendly recipe

4 servings

Ingredients

  • 1 lb. ground turkey
  • ¼ cup bread crumbs, gluten-free (If you don’t have any, you can substitute with a mild alternative flour.)
  • ¼ cup dried cranberries
  • 1 bunch green onions, sliced thin
  • 1 tbsp. fresh rosemary leaves, chopped
  • 1 tbsp. garlic powder
  • ½ tsp. salt (This was sufficient for me, but you may want more.  See Directions.)
  • ¼ tsp. worcestershire sauce

Directions

  1. Add all ingredients together in a large bowl.
  2. Mix with hands until ingredients are well combined.
  3. Taste mixture to see if it requires additional salt.  Add by ¼ tsps., if necessary.
  4. Make into 4 burger patties. 
  5. Cook on heated grill for 5-7 minutes.

For Weight Watchers: Eat patty is 5 points on the Points plan and 5.5 points on the PointsPlus plan.

“Free Spirit” Fried Rice

"Free Spirit" Fried Rice with Asparagus and More Carrots

Tasty, nourishing, and filling—this rice and vegetable dish is for “free spirits” who like to experiment.

You'll like us in your stir fry!

You'll like us in your stir fry!

It can be expanded indefinitely with other fresh vegetables (I’ve provided a list of those I’ve used below) as well as firm tofu (cubed), or cooked shrimp, chicken, or turkey if you want a main meal.  In the picture above, I added leftover Sesame Asparagus with Carrots to the basic recipe.

Printer-friendly text

Cooking tips:

  • This dish cooks quickly so you should have all your ingredients prepared and measured beforehand.
  • If you add additional vegetables, you may have to increase the amount of soy sauce if your pan gets too dry.

Makes 4 servings of 1 cup each

Basic Ingredients

  • Cooking spray
  • ½ cup liquid egg substitute (equivalent of two eggs)
  • 1 cup carrots, shredded
  • 1 cup scallions, sliced
  • 3 cups cooked white rice
  • ½ cup frozen green peas, thawed
  • ¼ cup low-sodium or other no-wheat soy sauce
Other Vegetables You Can Add
  • ½ pound daikon, chopped
  • 2 cups bok choy (any type), shredded
  • 2 cups napa, Chinese, or regular cabbage, shredded
  • 1 cup enoki mushrooms, chopped
  • 1 cup fresh bean sprouts
  • 1 zucchini, sliced and quartered
  • 1 bunch Swiss chard
  • 1 bunch asparagus

Directions

  1. Spray large non-stick fry pan with cooking spray.
  2. Warm pan over medium-high heat.
  3. Add liquid egg substitute, tilting pan so that the liquid covers the bottom.
  4. Scramble the eggs and then break them into pieces (2-3 minutes).
  5. Remove eggs onto a plate and set them aside.
  6. Take pan off heat and spray again with cooking spray.
  7. Put back on medium-high heat.
  8. Add carrots and scallions (tofu and other fresh vegetables should also be added at this time).
  9. Cook until crisp-tender (2-3 minutes).
  10. Stir in rice, peas, and soy sauce.
  11. Cook until heated through, stirring once or twice (1-2 minutes).
  12. Stir in egg (and any cooked meat or shellfish).

For Weight Watchers: The basic recipe yields 4 servings of 1 cup each.

  • Points plan: The total count is 15 so each cup is worth approximately 4 points.
  • PointsPlus plan: The total count is 18.5 so each cup is worth approximately 4.5 points.

Notes:

  1. If you add more vegetables, you will add quantity but no other points.  Therefore, you’ll be lowering your point count per cup.
  2. If you add tofu, meat, or shellfish, you will have to add on its value to each serving.

Nutritional Information for a 1-cup serving:

  • Calories 200 (13.5 from fat)
  • Protein 10 grams
  • Fat 2 grams
  • Carbohydrate 42 grams
  • Fibre 3 grams
  • Cholesterol .3 mg
  • Sodium 1106.5 mg

(Adapted from “Easy Fried Rice” in the 2010 Weight Watchers Points Plus Getting Started booklet.)